video games gallery from the last century

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S-100Bus

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Alpha Microsystems AM-100

Altair 8800

1975


El MITS Altair 8800 es un microordenador de 1974 basado en el procesador Intel 8080. Tras aparecer en la portada de la revista Popular Electronics en diciembre de de 1974, el interés por esta máquina empezó a crecer muy deprisa.
Los creadores estimaban unas ventas de unos cientos de unidades, pero en el primer mes ya se superaban varios miles.
Se considera al Altair el iniciador de la revolución de los mocroordenadores.
El primer lenguaje de programación de esta máquina, Altair BASIC fué además el primer producto de Microsoft.


 Año 1975
Teclado No Teclado, but Interruptores on front panel.
CPU Intel 8080A (rarely 8080)
Velocidad 2 MHz (each instruction takes 4 clock cycles)
RAM 256 bytes (you had to buy this Memoria board)
ROM None
Modos de Texto None (optional 64 x 12 card)
Modo gráfico None
Tamaño/Peso Unknown
Puertos de entrada/salida Unknown
Fuente de alimentación Unknown
Precio $595

Compuduct Rainbow

Compupro Godbout S100

Cromemco Z-1

1976


El Cromemco Z-1, lanzado en agosto de 1976, era un microcomputador basado en el bus S-100. Fue el primer microcomputador que usó el Zilog Z80 microprocesador y fue el primer microcomputador fabricado por Cromemco

Cromemco Z-2D

1976

Cromemco System-3

Cromemco Z-2

Cromemco Z-2H

Exidy Sorcerer DP1000-2

Exidy Sorcerer DP1000-3

Exidy Sorcerer DP1000-4

Imsai 8080

1975


Altair 8800 clone

Micromation Z-Plus

Nabu 1100

NorthStar Horizon


The NorthStar Horizon is reported to be the first microcomputer to ship with internal diskette drives.

PolyMorphic System 8813

PolyMorphic Systems Poly-88

1976


With the release of their CPU card, PolyMorphic began selling complete systems.
Their first was the Poly-88, housed in a 5-slot S100 chassis, with additional side-mounted S-100 connectors for the purpose of joining chassis together.
This unit earned the nickname orange toaster due to its orange metal cover, and the fact that the S-100 cards generated noticeable heat.
The Poly-88 was available in kit form, or assembled. It was originally called the Micro-Altair, but after objections from MITS, manufacturers of the Altair, the name was changed.

Protec Pro80


The PRO-80 by Protec of Montreal, Quebec Canada is described as an S-100 Trainer. Essentially a single-board Z80 computer, this unit features a single S-100 expansion slot.

The system incorporates 1K or ROM, 1K or RAM (expandable on-board to 2K), and a keypad/display. The idea was to provide a very low cost means of experiementing with S-100 cards, albeit one card at a time.

S-100 Bus


The S-100 bus or Altair bus, IEEE 696-1983 (withdrawn), is an early computer bus designed in 1974 as a part of the Altair 8800.
The S-100 bus was the first industry standard expansion bus for the microcomputer industry. S-100 computers, consisting of processor and peripheral cards, were produced by a number of manufacturers.
The S-100 bus formed the basis for homebrew computers whose builders (e.g., the Homebrew Computer Club) implemented drivers for CP/M and MP/M.
These S-100 microcomputers ran the gamut from hobbyist toy to small business workstation and were common in early home computers until the advent of the IBM PC.

Sol-20 Terminal Computer

1976


Laying claim to be the first fully-assembled microcomputer with a built-in keyboard and television output, the Sol-20 was launched back in 1976.
It had more in common with the Altair 8800s and IMSAI 8080s of the day, than it did with the Apple and Commodore computers that were soon to follow, despite looking more like the latter

Tei MCS-112

Wynchester

Zenith Z-100

Zenith Z-110

Zenith Z-120