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Xerox


Xerox

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Xerox - Sistema3 - 286 compact

1984


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Xerox 16-8

1983


The Model 16/8, introduced in May 1983, has dual CPUs, an 8-bit Z80 and 16-bit Intel 8086, which can be booted jointly or separately.
The operating system is 8-bit CP/M-80 and 16-bit CP/M-86, and the computer was supplied with the WordStar word processor and dBase II database management system. It has double 8 floppy disk drives, a 12 monochrome monitor and a daisywheel printer. Later in 1984 double 5.25 floppy disk drives, a portrait-size blue monitor, and a laser printer were offered. The Model 16/8 is also called a Xerox 823.

Flipping the 8/16s console between 8 bit and 16 bit modes is accomplished by a simple keyboard control command.

Xerox 820

1981


The Xerox 820 Information Processor is an 8-bit desktop computer sold by Xerox in the early 1980s.
The computer runs under the CP/M operating system and uses floppy disk drives for mass storage.
The microprocessor board is a licensed variant of the Big Board computer.

Xerox 820 II

1982

Xerox 820 II Disk Drive

Xerox 860

1980

Xerox Alto

1973


The Xerox Alto is a computer designed from its inception to support an operating system based on a graphical user interface (GUI), later using the desktop metaphor.
The first machines were introduced on 1 March 1973, a decade before mass-market GUI machines became available.

Xerox Daybreak

1985


The Daybreak ran the ViewPoint (later GlobalView) GUI and was used extensively throughout Xerox until being replaced by Suns and PCs. Although years ahead of its time, it was never a commercial success. The proprietary closed architecture and Xeroxs reluctance to release the Mesa development environment for general use stifled any third-party development.

A fully configured 6085 came with an 80MB hard disk, 3.7MB of RAM, a 5¼-inch floppy disk drive, an Ethernet controller, and a PC emulator card containing an 80186 CPU. The basic system comes with 1.1MB of RAM and a 10MB hard disk. It was introduced in 1985 at US$4,995 (equivalent to $12,585 in 2021).

Daybreak is the final release in the D* (pronounced D-Star) series of machines, some of which share the Wildflower instruction set architecture, designed by Butler Lampson. Machines in this series include, in order, Dolphin, Dorado, Dicentra, Dandelion, Dandetiger, Daybreak, the never-manufactured Daisy, and Dragonfly a 4-processor VLSI CPU developed at PARC and intended for a high-end printing system.

The Daybreak was sold as a Xerox 1186 workstation when configured as a Lisp machine. It was sold as the Xerox 6085 PCS (Professional Computer System) or Viewpoint 6085 PCS when sold as an office workstation running the Viewpoint system. Viewpoint is based on the Star software originally developed for the Xerox Star.

Xerox Infran Edition

Xerox Star

1981


The Xerox Star workstation, officially named Xerox 8010 Information System, is the first commercial personal computer to incorporate technologies that have since become standard in personal computers, including a bitmapped display, a window-based graphical user interface, icons, folders, mouse (two-button), Ethernet networking, file servers, print servers, and e-mail.

Introduced by Xerox Corporation on April 27, 1981, the name Star technically refers only to the software sold with the system for the office automation market. The 8010 workstations were also sold with software based on the programming languages Lisp and Smalltalk for the smaller research and software development market.

Xerox Sunrise 1800

1983

Xerox 820 II Keyboard

Keyboard

Xerox Alto Mouse

Mouse

Xerox Star Mouse

Mouse