video games gallery from the last century

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Heathkit

    Pongs:2 ( :1 )    Computers:5 ( :1 )    Art


Heathkit ET-3400

1976

Heathkit GD-1380

1976


Heathkit was a famous kit manufacturer in the 1970s. Their catalog was long: it proposed everything from simple projects to advanced test equipment, color TV sets, Hi-Fi, and of course video games.

This kit (model GD-1380) was released in 1976. It plays the six games of the AY-3-8500 chip, and has several interesting features. First, it requires a Heathkit TV set to operate because of its composite output. Back in 1976, only monitors and hi-tech equipment had a composite input. To use this system, the user had to open his TV set in order to connect a few wires to its electronic circuits. This is the case with the Heathkit TV sets: the user manual explains how to connect the system to several TV sets released by Heathkit. The system has another interesting feature: the sound does not come from the system itself like most of the other PONG consoles, but comes from the TV set. The main reason for this is the direct connexion of the system to the TV set. Since the TV had to be open for connecting, why not connecting additional wires to the audio amplifier of the TV instead of using a speaker in the system ? Using the TV as audio output was not possible with regular systems which used a video modulator. Outputing the sound to the TV would have required additional circuits, hence a higher price of the systems. Here, the system benefits of a direct connexion to the TV set, hence the possibility of using the audio circuits of the TV without additional costs. A last thing: the blue electronic gun of the system is very funny, and the user manual is extremely detailed.

Heathkit GD-1999

1976


Clon del National Semiconductor Adversary system (model 370), fabricado tras el lanzamiento del chip MM-57100 en 1976.
Solo se diferencian en las etiquetas de los mandos y la unidad central.

Se puede considerar un semi-kit,ya que aunque había que montar las piezas, todos los componentes de la placa venían soldados y ajustados.


 uP 8046
  uP 8046

Heathkit H100

Heathkit H11

Heathkit H120

Heathkit H8

1977


he H8 was the first computer available from Heathkit, released in late 1977. Computer systems from other manufacturers were also available as kits, but the practice was quickly falling out of favor. Most were available only as fully-assembled systems.

Although the H8 was relatively inexpensive at $379, the stock H8 included only the chassis and the CPU card.
At least one H8-1 memory board with 4K of RAM ($140) must be installed to run any appreciable software programs.
To use an audio cassette drive for data storage, the H8-5 Serial I/O card ($110) must be installed.
To upgrade to the floppy drive system, at least 16K of RAM must be installed.

For reliability, the CPU board came pre-assembled, but everything else was available in kit form. In 1978 the H-17 dual-floppy drive ($675) became available - previously only an audio cassette recorder could be used for data storage.

Heathkit H9 Videoterminal

Heathkit GD-1380 Gun

Light gun